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All About the Windward Tag Editor Symbols

Overview 

If you prefer to write your own statements rather than use Windward's Wizards, there are some important Symbols for you to know about. The example is specific to the If Tag, but the symbols are relevent to many other tags.

The Symbols

When you enter a statement, the Tag Editor tries to guess how to evaluate your statement. The symbols help override its interpretations (for good or for ill!) In the majority of cases, it guesses correctly. 

 

These symbols are:

 

= The '=' symbol tells the Tag Editor to evaluate the statement, and not query the data source. The Tag Editor will show that “evaluate” was selected.
! The ‘!’ tells the Tag Editor that it must check the data source for one of the values in the statement. The Tag Editor will show that "select" was selected.
' The  '  tells the Tag Editor that the statement is a literal statement. The Tag editor will show that “value” was selected. 
(no preceding symbol) The Tag Editor guesses how to evaluate your statement
${} Remember that variables in Windward Products use the form  ${variablenamehere}

 

Here's where they correspond in the Tag Editor:

 

Tag-Specific Uses

Import Tag

  • When listing a file path, use a ' before the path to tell the Tag Editor to check this location instead of checking your data source.

 

If Tag

  • See the samples below to help show the uses of the symbols with If Tags.

 

Set Tag

  • To set a numeric value, such as Zero, use = like this:  =0

Sample Template for If Tags

This article uses a template and specific data source (XML). Make sure to download both in order to play around with the different symbols. 

Template

TagEditorSymbolsSample.xml

 

Try copying and pasting these statements into the first If Tag to see what changes occur in the template and in the Tag Editor. 

Remeber that the If Tag evaluates a Boolean Statement to true or false, and then prints (or doesn't print) the content between the If and End If tags. For more on the If Tag, see the If Tag Reference.

If you need more information about the MID function, click here.

 

 

  •  =${MonthNum}='01' 
    •  This will not work because the internal Macro Evaluator has been triggered due to the ‘=’ sign. The Tag Editor will not query the data source, so the value is returned as false and “It’s not January” is printed. The Tag Editor will show that “evaluate” was selected, see the upper left corner.
  •  !${MonthNum}='01' 
    • This DOES work because the ‘!’ tells the Tag Editor that it must check the data source for one of the values in the statement. The Tag Editor will show that “evaluate” was selected in the upper left corner, but the ‘!’ tells the tag that it has to check the data source for part of the statement.
  • ‘${MonthNum}='01' 
    • This DOES work because the ‘ ’ ’ tells the Tag Editor that the statement is a literal statement, then the Tag Editor further determines that there is a variable (${MonthNum}) that it needs to check for a value in order to finish the comparison statement. The Tag Editor will show that “value” was selected in the upper left corner, so it recognizes the variable and checks the datasource for the value.
  • ${MonthNum}='01' 
    •  (no additional symbols at the beginning) does not work because the internal Macro Evaluator has been triggered. Since the statement appears to be an equation (x=y), the Tag Editor will not query the data source, so the value is returned as false and “It’s not January” is printed. The Tag Editor will show that “evaluate” was selected, see the upper left corner.

Bonus 

  • /datasource/frontCover/company_address/name[starts-with(., 'A')]
    •  This does work, and “January” is printed. If this statement is pasted into the If tag, it checks to see if the first letter of the name was ‘A’. It evaluates successfully without ‘=’ or ‘!’ because there was no variable involved and the Tag Editor assumed that it needed to check the data source. The Tag Editor will show that “select” was selected, see the upper left corner.
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